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Breakfast Miso Soup

Posted on December 7, 2013 at 11:00 AM




In our family, breakfast is not complete without miso soup.  My son likes to dip his toast in miso soup, which is something I have never seen Japanese people do, but he says it's good.


My own mother never made miso soup for breakfast, even though it is part of a traditional breakfast in Japan. But when we moved to the US in the 70s, she yearned for good miso.  One day, she cooked a pot full of soybeans and blended them to make a mushy white paste, to which she added salt and koji, a miso starter made from fermented rice, and created a huge mess in the kitchen.


The resulting miso was kept it in a lidded clay jar in the cool and dark corner of the garage to ferment for years. I used to sneak in there and stick in my finger  to lick the thick, grainy paste that looked like mud. Later, when I was much older, I realized I was snacking on a healthy protein, minerals and vitamin-rich live food. 


Miso comes in various shades of white and red varieties. Red (aka) miso like sendai and haccho are dark brown in color, and robust in flavor. Miso can be made by mixing fermented rice, koji, salt and grains, including barley, wheat, and legumes like fava beans and azuki beans.  White (shiro) miso pastes like saikyo are yellow in color, lighter and sweeter than red miso paste, and made primarily of koji. My miso soup is hearty.  I like to have a variety of vegetables from the land and sea. You can experiment with different types of miso. Some are saltier than the others, so when making miso soup, always taste the soup and make adjustments.  I always keep a variety in the fridge and some fermenting in the garage. I let my whim dictate which miso to use for my breakfast miso soup.

 

Miso Soup With Fava Beans, Zucchini and Tofu

 

3 1/2 cups Dashi 

3 1/2 to 4 tablespoons Mugi, Koji, white or red miso

1/4 cup, cooked and shelled fava beans

1/4 block -tofu, diced in to 1/4 -1/2 squares

1/2 zucchini, sliced thinly, 1/8 inch thick

1 scallion, sliced thinly, 1/8 inch thick

Bring the Dashi and the turnip o a boil in a medium saucepan, then reduce the heat to maintain a simmer and add the zucchini for a couple of minutes.

In a small bowl, dissolve 3 1/2 tablespoons of the miso paste in a few tablespoons of the warm Dashi. Add the mixture to the saucepan. Taste and add more miso paste, Dashi or water, depending on how strong the soup tastes.

Add the tofu and fava beans and simmer for 1 minute. Turn off heat.

Pour the soup into individual bowls. Garnish with sliced scallions.

Serve immediately.

 

 


Categories: A Bowl of Soba , Breakfast Fare

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3 Comments

Reply sonokosso sakai
8:54 PM on December 29, 2013 
It should be ok. White miso has less salt so it should be used within a year.
Taste it to make sure it's good.
Reply sonoko sakai
8:51 PM on December 29, 2013 
Kathie says...
Recently I purchased some white miso and came home to find another in my fridge....if left unopened will it be safe to eat well past the expiration date?

I look forward to trying this beautiful recipe!

Thank you!
Reply Kathie
2:38 PM on December 28, 2013 
Recently I purchased some white miso and came home to find another in my fridge....if left unopened will it be safe to eat well past the expiration date?

I look forward to trying this beautiful recipe!

Thank you!