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Soba Work Shop - 2009

Posted on October 30, 2009 at 7:24 PM



Akila Inouye and his son Yusuke left for Tokyo this morning.  We were up packing and celebrating the completion of our four workshops till 2am last night. Thanks to everyone who participated in the workshop.  I am planning to do another workshop in April with Akila, so please mark your calendars.  I will keep you all posted. Here is the link to Akila Inouye's Tsukiji Soba Academy. If you are planning a trip to Tokyo, do visit the Academy.  






On a personal note, this was the first soba workshop I produced out of my house. I learned a lot about what it takes to organize one; it's a little bit like producing films, only you get covered in buckwheat flour. What am I getting myself into...? was the question that kept popping up in my head, as the workshop grew from one to two, two to three, and three to four.  I wasn't even sure we could even fill up one workshop.  But we managed to pull them all off.  We sold out all four!  Thank you!


Thanks to my friends Keiko and Taku Shinomoto of Tortoise for all their support. Keiko took most of these photos. 



Many people say that soba is a hard craft to learn but Akila made it so accessible

and fun for all of us. I enjoyed making soba by hand, ate lots of it, and still want more. That's the beauty of soba. One nevers seems to tire of it. The best part of doing the workshop at home was making new friends, and hanging out with my dear old ones in my kitchen.  




Oh, and I must not forget to thank Yusuke, Akila's son. This was his first visit to the U.S. but instead of sightseeing, he spent most of his time grating daikon radish in my kitchen, and doing the dishes. Next time he comes to LA, I will take him to Amoeba and some other cool places.





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For those of you that ordered Uchiko, the cost is $4 for 200grams.  This is the amount you will need for 1000 grams of buckwheat / wheat flour.  I will follow up with you by e mail.

I have extra Uchiko flour, premium stone milled fresh buckwheat flour from Japan and Canada so if you would like to buy some, please give me a call.


Please go tot he photo gallery to view more pictures from the workshop. Please feel free to post your photos.  In the meantime, here is the recipe for the Dipping Broth. Please call me or e mail me if you have any questions. The recipe for the Hongaeshi (dipping sauce base) serves sixty but this keeps for a month in a cool place and can be adjusted to suit your needs. Same with the Morizuyu (dipping sauce).


During this soba tour, Akila did a soba demonstration and interview for the Los Angeles Times Food Section.  I also contributed a soba story on soba side dishes. These stories and recipes are scheduled to appear in the Times in December.

Finally, please posts comments and suggestions about the workshop.


 

Arigato!  


Sonoko





Please also check out the Los Angeles Times feature story on Akila Inouye, Making soba at home, with step by step photographs, recipes for dipping sauces and side dishes. (Here is the link) 


How to make Morizuyu (Dipping sauce for cold soba noodles)

 

[Summary] by Akila Inouye


 

To make morizuyu, prepare the Hongaeshi (dipping sauce base) first.

Add the hongaeshi to dashi stock to finalize it.

Hongaeshi will keep for a month in a cool and dry place, or in the fridge.

The dashi should be prepared each time.


 

[How to prepare Hon-gaeshi  (Dipping sauce base)

 

60 servings


1.0L Soy sauce (Koikuchi/regular type)

200ml Hon Mirin (Must use a real thing made from rice, rice sprit and rice malt)

133g Sugar (Reccommend Japanese white coarse sugar but generic sugar

in US should be okay)

 

 

Put the sugar and mirin into a pot.

Dissolve the sugar completely with medium heat.

Add the soy sauce and heat until the temperature reaches 70 degrees (centigrade).

Cover the pot with a clean cloth or other material instead of hard lid.

Set aside the pot until it is no longer steaming

and the liquid cools to room temperature. 

Store the liquid in a cool and dry place, or refrigerate.

You can keep the base for a couple of months.


 

[How to finish Morizuyu]

 

17 servings

 

1.2 L Clear water (soft type should be great)

70 g Sliced bonito

350 ml Hongaeshi

Dash of Mirin (Optional)

Dash of Sake (Optional)



Boil the water for making the dashi.

Put dried bonito flakes into the boiling hot water.

Lower heat and continue cooking for a minute.

Strain the dashi liquid with kitchen paper.

(The dashi liquid's amount comes to about 1,000 ml because  

10 percent of the water will evaporate during the cooking, and the dried bonito will

absorb another 10 percent).

Add the hongaeshi to the dashi and then heat it to 70 degrees (centigrade).

Add dash of Mirin and Sake, but this is optional.

Cool down the pot with a plenty of ice.

Serve 80 ml for each serving.

The Morizuyu will keep in a refrdgerator for 3 days.




Categories: Noodles, Pasta and Dumplings, Workshops

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5 Comments

Reply zerflurgesews
9:44 PM on January 31, 2011 
dobry poczatek
Reply sonoko Sakai
9:22 PM on March 6, 2010 
Hi Rick,
I just got back from Tokyo and didn't realize you had posted a comment until now. The recipe for mori tsuyu was given to me by Akila Inouye. Yes, I think
he meant briefly... but when actually make the Tsuyu in class, we let the tsuyu come to a simmer, so we let it cook for about 5 minutes, but not 30 minutes,
as you are suggesting for the thick type. Since you make the dashi first, I don't think there should be any difference. Are you LA based? Akila is coming to LA to do a workshop in late May?

Rich Watanabe says...
Hello Sonoko-san,
I am sending this message from Tokyo.
I myself, make soba after learning at Inoue's school in Tukiji, Toyo some 8 years ago. I have a question, In your morizuyu explanation, you say "cook for a munite" but it could be too short, Do you use very thin type or thick type of sliced bonitto.
When I use thick type, I usually cook it for 30 minutes.
In the meantime, I enjoyed reading Santa Monica Soba school story.
Regards,
Rich Watanabe
Reply Rich Watanabe
1:01 AM on January 6, 2010 
Hello Sonoko-san,
I am sending this message from Tokyo.
I myself, make soba after learning at Inoue's school in Tukiji, Toyo some 8 years ago. I have a question, In your morizuyu explanation, you say "cook for a munite" but it could be too short, Do you use very thin type or thick type of sliced bonitto.
When I use thick type, I usually cook it for 30 minutes.
In the meantime, I enjoyed reading Santa Monica Soba school story.
Regards,
Rich Watanabe
Reply Kevin
2:40 PM on November 2, 2009 
Wow! That looked like a lot of fun...hopefully you can produce more workshops in the future.
Reply Ellen
11:49 PM on October 30, 2009 
The Soba workshop was fantastic! I learned so much & Akila was amazing to watch & his natural grace was contagious. Being able to attempt making Soba noodles from scratch was a challenge & I definitely respect the Master.Thanks so much Sonoko for producing this workshop & being such a gracious hostess.